Where is the Spirituality in Architecture?

Where is the Spirituality in Architecture?
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Think of silence. Think of space. Think of the glories of absence: absence from, rather than things. Often, simple elegance and peace is the greatest luxury. A reprieve from Twitter and texts sounds glorious. Of course, it’s just a click away for any of us but can we? Are we free to?

What if we miss something? What if we miss this?

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By definition, not everything can be exceptional. But there are a select few in each generation who stand out from the seemingly endless sea of mediocrity, breaking through the cacophony of internet noise through shocking and, at times, almost unsettling feats of innovation. This Catholic Cathedral in the heart of downtown is one of them. The Cathedral of the Madeline’s delicate and stern architecture is only to be admired. You can’t not admire it. You have to. It forces you to.

Spirituality is a tough subject. In the internet age, we prize the visible, the tangible, the clear and the gamefied. That’s fine. Facts are great. But an overwhelming, awe-inspiring experience can’t be described using facts and figures.

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When I see something beautifully constructed by masters of their field, I’m inspired. Is that weird to say? I’m inspired by design. Paint, chairs, cement, and stone. I guess you could describe the feeling of fantastic design as spirituality. A man of refined taste and strong artistic sensibility, Bishop Glass designed and enlisted the aid of John Theodore Comes, one of the leading architects in America at the time, to undertake beautification of the interior. And they added everything the eye can’t possibly take in all at one time. My hat’s off to them, and if God exists, I’ll tip my hat to him too.

 

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